The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far From the Tree, Unless the Tree Sits on a Tall Thin Mountain and the Wind is Blowing Hard

The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far From the Tree, Unless the Tree Sits on a Tall Thin Mountain and the Wind is Blowing Hard

Isaac Newton created the formula that determines the rate something falls towards the earth when unobstructed or unimpeded by outside forces, or the rate gravitational force, if you will.

Now, the story goes that one young Mr. Newton sat below an apple tree the day he theorized his now famous idea of universal gravitation. The mentioned theory would go on to inspire hundreds if not thousands of other monumental scientific discoveries and to this day is one of the most important moments in history. But, the phrase, “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree” clearly assumes an apple falling from a tree that does not sit on top of a very tall and very thin mountain on an exceptionally blustery day…

That apple would fall very far from its tree.

Very Far.

Also, let’s assume the ground upon which the apple lands is bouncy and without many obstructions and sure, why not let the apple be especially tolerant to force. It’s a strong apple. In fact, it’s hobbies include cardiovascular exercise and rolling.

Yes, that apple would fall very far from its tree.

Very far.

-A Well-Mannered Scholar

The Apple Doesn’t Fall Far From the Tree, Unless the Tree Sits on a Tall Thin Mountain and the Wind is Blowing Hard
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